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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 209 (some duplicates have been removed)
in afghanistan under investigation after new revelations in the cia sex scandal. >> in cairo, eu foreign ministers and members of the arab league discuss the syrian crisis. the lenders in charge of patching up the eurozone have gone head to head in a very public disagreement on the best way to deal with grease. >> at a meeting in brussels, the head of the imf and -- the heads of the imf and eurozone clashed over when greece should reduce its debt. >> but they did at least agree on a few things -- above all the grece could have at least two years to cut deficit. >> it is a question of how much progress greece can realistically be expected to make in a particular amount of time. >> greece's international lenders were playing down their differences the morning after the clash over athens' debts. the imf wants greece to achieve its lower ratio by 2020 while the eu foreign ministers want to allow the country two more years. >> there's no disagreement between the imf and the euro group, but the way forward is difficult. even if we agree on a target date, we have to figure out how to get there.
the egyptian president, along with representatives from qatar and turkey, held talks in cairo with hamas' leader in exile. the israelis call him a terrorist, but so far, they haven't object the to the egyptians' efforts. margaret. >> brennan: allen pizzey in tel aviv. thank you. for more on the gaza conflict we're joined in washington by our senior national security analyst, juan zarate. juan, good evening. >> good evening, margaret. >> brennan: what exactly is egypt trying to accomplish? >> well, egypt is trying to broker a cease-fire here. they want the violence to stop. they also want to demonstrate that they can serve as a regional power, they can bring peace, and for the sake of president morsi and the muslem brotherhood running egypt they want to consolidate power and get the economy running. they don't want a war to be starting on their doorstep at a time when they are not in full control in cairo. >> reporter: egypt and israel are the top recipients of u.s. foreign aid. what kind of leverage does the u.s. have? >> president obama has pledged $1 billion in aid to the egyptian gove
pictures now. cairo, egypt, tahrir square. and thousands of people are refusing to go home. they are angry at their president. they say he's made himself a dictator. it's quiet now in cairo. it's just after 2:00 a.m., but it definitely was not quiet earlier in the day. listen. tear gas filled the air and crowds of protesters scattered when riot police tried to break up the protests in cairo. we have reports of demonstrators trying to break into the offices of the president's party, the muslim brotherhood. and at least one person reportedly died today in the street violence, a teenager. cnn's reza sayah spent much of the day right in the middle of the chaos in cairo. >> we keep seeing these clashes between protesters and police, protesters throwing rocks at police. police responding by firing tear gas and stun grenades. we're just a few blocks away from tahrir square. we should point out most of these protesters are young men, 20-something, teenagers, hard to say if they're here fighting for democracy or here to cause some trouble. those were chants of down with president mo
for what could be another night of deadly attacks despite the diplomatic activity in cairo. negotiations are under way as well as palestinian factions as to what to do next, but those here in gaza say they are preparing for a ground invasion, and meaning if israel launches a war, they will fight and they are prepared to defend their territory as they say and on the same side israelis say they have finalized preparation for a ground invasion and now it is a matter of a political decision, and certainly something that everybody in cairo is trying to avert, but one that everybody here thinks it is not going to be averted any time soon. thomas? >> well, you talk about the diplomatic conversations in cairo, and what is on the table? what terms are being discussed? >> well, two central issues from the two perspectives. the head of the hamas today held a press conference in which he highlighted hamas position, and that is simple in their eyes, israel must stop all hostilities against the leadership and assassinating and killing key palestinian figures and call on the international community to
tear gassed protesters in cairo's tahrir square. angry demonstrators packed the square today denouncing egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look at cairo today, it doesn't seem like it. the demonstrations are continuing. so are clashes. about an hour and a half ago clashes taking place right where we are behind us at the hotel we're staying at. security forces clashing with protesters. a number of protesters ambushed a police vehicle carrying riot police. the police took off. the protesters got ahold of this truck, set it on fire. more security forces came in, shot tear gas and disbursed the protesters. we've seen similar clashes throughout the day. all
with the head of palestinian factions in cairo. trying to secure a commitment from these factions to cease all hostilities and rocket fire into israel. from an israeli perspective. that is a game changer. it potentially means two of israel's largest population centers are now within reach of palestinian rockets. >> we have more than 4 million people. we have to protect. and again, again. you see. let's go. let's go. >> the fear is, if these talks in cairo fail, and they are unable to get a cessation of hostilities, a ground invasion could be imminent. from everyone we have been speaking to in gaza in terms of officials and palestinians, politicians and others, the people of gaza would suffer the most. that would be a disastrous consequence for inhabitants. >>> coming up next, president obama is headed overseas. we'll have a preview of his trip and update on the so-called fiscal cliff. >> nbc bay area received help for the food drive from a few stars. one human. one dragon. we'll explain coming up. >>> a south bay teenager, credited with saving her mother's life. and how a sunnyvale girl used s
on public television in america and around the globe. tonight cairo has become the focus point for protest. tens of thousands gathered to have their voices heard. days after muhammed morsi granted himself powers, his opponents are calling on him to reverse course. there is little signs the standoff is breaking. >> of the march back to tahir square . this is a rally of lawyers. for many, it is the first time they have joined a demonstration. they strongly oppose the edict no courts can touch him. >> he is a dictator. we have created somebody more than hosni mubarak. >> the president tried to appease judges, some of his strongest critics. in a five hour meeting, he told them his new powers would be limited. but they were not satisfied. on the edge of the square, the clashes began release today. protesters in threw sticks at the u.s. embassy. the police responded with tear gas. hear, the casualty toll is widening. these protesters are furious with the president. many fear he wants to turn the country in to listen now -- into an islamic state. some of them are kids looking for a fight. politic
of the possibility of a cease-fire. hamas officials say, in fact, it would have been announced hours ago in cairo. clearly, that's not happening. there's no sign of a cease-fire. in fact, certainly, if you look -- if we go back over the last few hours, five or six hours, it's been an evening of fairly intense fire, not only incoming israeli air strikes, but just a little while ago, we saw two rockets being launched also from this area behind me. and certainly by the looks of those rockets, and we're getting very good at recognizing them, some of them do appear to be these so-called 5 rockets, which have a fairly long range, rockets fired in the direction of tel aviv and jerusalem. also today, one of those rockets falling to the south near the settlement block in the west bank. and another building, an israeli building a town outside tel aviv on the road to jerusalem. so we've seen a fairly intense evening, certainly, of violence here, incoming, as well as outgoing. and all this talk about a ceasefire and discussions in cairo and elsewhere don't seem to be amounting to much at this time. now, toda
of protests that got rid of his predecessor. details from cairo. >> the crowd, the chants, the violence in tamrir square that overthrough egyptian leader mubarak, but this time to his successor, mohammed morsi. >> this is a new era in egypt. and this is not what it was about. and it's about the president from all of these unquestioned rights. and now, it's just, we're way stepped back than where we were before. >> the protests, which include a ransacking of the muslim brotherhood headquarters in alexandria, after sweeping new powers that he could issue any decree and any issue would be filed and not to be appealed or overturned by the courts. >> the revolution has passed, but will not stop. the judiciary is a respected institution along with loyal members, those who wish to hide within the institution i'll be watching them. >> morsi says the moves are temporary. in a few month's time and they call a necessary move to defeat holdovers. and the moves have infuriated the opposition, one time egyptian presidential candidate mohammed el baradei says that he's setting himself up. and today, m
with its own people. [chanting] just ahead protests in the streets of cairo and why the egyptian president ♪ backing down. what of the israeli truce? plus the u.s. ambassador to the united nations susan rice took some heat over her comments on the libya consulate attack. now it looks like though her critics have some ammunition against their claims. now she is going to go speak to some of them on capitol hill. benghazi and susan rice and is the tide turning? that's coming up from the journalists of fox news on this monday fox report. a hybrid? most are just no fun to drive. now, here's one that will make you feel alive. meet the five-passenger ford c-max hybrid. c-max says ha. c-max says wheeee. which is what you get, don't you see? cause c-max has lots more horsepower than prius v, a hybrid that c-max also bests in mpg. say hi to the all-new 47 combined mpg c-max hybrid. olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great
of protests that continues to rage across the country. meanwhile the u.s. embassy in cairo says there are sporadic clashes between protesters and police near its entrance. we're told some rocks landed inside the walls of that huge compound. embassy officials say there is no indication they are the target. egypt wields enormous influence in the middle east peac process. that power demonstrated by brokering the cease-fire between is rainfall and hamas. steve care began streaming live too cairo with the latest developments right now. steve? >> reporter: jon, this is a key meeting between egypt's president and the chief justices in cairo. already there are hints from the president's side that compromise may be in the offing. perhaps a scaling down of that presidential decree which basically puts the president above the law and above the courts. the judges have been one of the bitterest opponents of the movement by the president. many judges across the country actually going out on strike. we may see a compromise in the meeting. appears the president underestimated the reaction to hi
whether it is the cairo speech he delivered in 2009 or your repeated at important declarations on prevention of the iranian nuclear capability, actions matter most. do not mistake the former for the latter. i have to step out of my role for a moment because as an historian, today is the anniversary of my favorite ever presidential statement on the middle east. 70 years ago today, president franklin delano roosevelt issued the following statement to the peoples of the middle east -- imagine a president saying this -- "praise be done to you under god the compassionate and made the blessing of god be upon you. this is a great deal for you because behold, we, the american holy warriors have arrived. we have come here to fight the great jihad of freedom. we have come to set you free. today is the 70th anniversary of the landing on north africa. imagine an american president praising the great jihad of american freedom. we don't remember that because of words matter so much less than actions. all right, if those are three broad lessons, what are the three most urgent issues of your a
in this process. i will carry this message to cairo tomorrow. i will also be consulting with president abas in ramala. let me also say to echo the prime minister, i'm very pleased that the iron dome defense system is performing so well. our partnership in support of this system represents america's enduring commitment to the safety and security of the israeli people and to israel's right to defend itself. but no defense is perfect. and our hearts break for the loss of every civilian israeli and palestinian and for all those who have been wounded or who are living in fear and danger. i know today was a difficult day. and i offer my deepest condolences to the loved ones of those who were lost and injured. in the end there is no substitute for security and for a just and lasting peace. and the current crisis certainly focuses us on the urgency of this broader goal. so in the days ahead the united states will work with our partners here in israel and across the region toward an outcome that bolsters security for the people of israel, improves conditions for the people of gaza and moves toward a
on this situation with ian lee in cairo tonight. what's the situation right now? >> reporter: well, tom, it's 2:00 a.m. now in cairo. and the protests are still going on. we're still seeing clashes in and around tahrir square between the protesters and the police. we're seeing a range of things thrown back and forth. rocks, we've seen molotov cocktails, we've seen tear gas. there are reports of police shooting into the air to scare off protesters. this is a very intense scene we've seen. we haven't seen anything like this really since a year ago when we saw clashes, when we saw dozens of people killed. this has really been the most intense set of clashes since then and all these protesters are angry about that power grab you were describing where president morsi really has no one overseeing him. the judiciary, he has pushed that aside. he now has really full power and tomorrow, we're going to be watching closely, also, the judiciaries said they might strike basically grinding the whole country's court system to a halt in retaliation for this power grab and also need to point out there are have been
with any envoys. he will be heading back to cairo tomorrow to meet with hillary clinton. egyptian officials involved or familiar with them have been telling nbc news this is unlikely to be a long-term truce. this is more likely to be a cessation of hostilities in the short term to pave the way for longer discussions about the fundamental issues as to why this persistent problem keeps coming up, the siege on gaza, rockets into southern israel and outstanding issues. what we can say so far is that all indications suggest that there will be a truce at some point. palestinian factions here say they are open to it. they say nothing has been signed. they don't mind having a short-term truce. so long as egypt will guarantee the fundamental issues of the bigger problems of gaza are addressed and not kicked down the road. i think that's something that martin suggested. there are a lot of fund mental issues that need to be resolved. no indication all of those have been addressed in the short-term cessation of hostilities which egyptian officials say is within their reach, although nothing yet officia
to cairo where she's meeting with the egyptian president mursi. mrs. clinton making it clear that she is not interested in a quick fix in gaza. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability, and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> cnn reporters flanking the middle east today to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of the crisis in gaza and in jerusalem and in israel. ben wedeman is in gaza city. frederick pleitgen is in ashkelon city. we begin with sara sidner at the scene of that bus explosion that happened just a little while ago in tel aviv. sara first of all describe for me how that looks right now. >> what has happened right now is the cleanup is under way. there are still tape up around the scene. we're very close to the defense department building, and the military headquarters, this is a bus that the number 61 bus, we know that it exploded, glass all around the bus was blown out. however the blast was not strong enough to knock out the ability for the bus to operate. and so we saw literally the b
brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we have reports from tel aviv, gaza, and cairo. and ray suarez examines the prospects ahead for the peace deal. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner reports from turkey where the syrian civil war is having an impact along the shared 500 mile border and in ankara. >> with fighting in syrian areas, spilling over into turkish towns, turkey finds itself walking a fine line between defending its interests, and being drawn into a regional war. >> brown: after the deluge: we assess the impact of all the money spent in the most expensive campaign in history. >> woodruff: as recovery costs from superstorm sandy continue to rise, paul solman looks at weather risks and the business of insurance. >> all insurance companies are paying very careful attention to the variability and the volatility in the climate. >> brown: and poet joy harjo celebrates the focal point of families and thanksgiving: the kitchen table. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 ye
, and she'll meet with leaders in cairo next. now, the other deal, the president and congressional leaders are working on, no progress on the fiscal cliff either. congressional leaders are taking a holiday breaks from the talks, but staff members have not been encouraged by their early huddles. let me bring in politico's deputy white house editor and joanne green, managing editor of the brie owe and msnbc contributor. good morning. >> good morning. >> we'll get to the situation in the middle east in just a minute. i want to start with the fiscal cliff and politico's front page today. "rough start for fiscal cliff talks." looked like everything was going really well after that first meeting. now that the dealing is really getting under way, the sources tell politico neither side seems actually all that serious. what's going on here? >> our reporting shows that despite the politics of the seeming to suggest that a deal should be struck and despite the meeting that happened with the congressional leaders at the white house last week that had everybody walk out of it and use the word construct
of the egyptian in cairo, there were protests about this anti-muslim film. the republicans have pounced on that. you heard john mccain and lindsey graham saying there is no way they want her to be secretary of state, nominated to secretary of state. everybody knew that it was terrorism. >> everybody knew it was terrorism. well, today, one of the things that david petraeus said is that he knew right away it was terrorism. and in the talking points, they took that out because it was classified and they talked about extremists. now susan rice says this began as a spontaneous, not premeditated response to what happened in cairo. i don't think her language was very careful. that's why they pounced on that language. i think things were slightly settled down today because you heard from dave petraeus because he said she was giving these talking points. i don't think it's settled down completely. i think you'll probably still see john mccain and lindsey graham. >> do you think she'll be secretary of state? >> i don't know. i don't know whether she'll be nominated. that is one of the things that preside
himself sweeping powers last week. correspondent steve harrigan has the latest from cairo. >> egypt president mohammed morsi is looking for a way out the fire storm he created thursday when he claimed the orders were not subject to review by egypt's court that move sparked four days of violent street in egypt. in the protest, 13 offices of the muslim brotherhood, morsi's chief supporters were ransacked or set on fire. morsi met today with senior judges from the judiciary council looking for a compromise to halt the violence. aides say morsi might be willing to limit the scope of his decree, but not withdraw it entirely. morsi supporters say the increased powers are only temporary, until a new constitution is completed. opponents say it's a power grab and part of an attempt to instill islamic law in egypt. >> we demand the president listen to people who chose it. people elected him so he would defend the people. not to do what he pleases. >> the administration was careful with the words. not overly critical. we raised concerns. that in part answers the questions. >> they reach out fo
and negotiate an end to the current round of fighting. this morning there are conflicting reports out of cairo that israel and gaza could be close to a truce. clarissa ward is in the egyptian capital. good morning, clarissa. >> reporter: good morning, charlie and norah. the egyptian president morsi has said repeatedly he hopes to announce a cease-fire agreement imminently. but cbs news has spoken to a source very close to the hamas delegation here in cairo. they said that so far these talks are not going anywhere. now, one of the reasons for that may be that hamas is making some pretty big demands in exchange for stopping its rocket attacks on israel. primarily it wants an end to the israeli blockade of the gaza strip. israel unlikely to budge on that issue because of fears that lifting the blockade would lead to an influx of weapons that could get into the hands of militants inside gaza. as you said, u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon is on his way to cairo now for talks as diplomatic efforts here really intensify to try to stop this conflict from escalating to a point of no return. >> claris
streaming live from cairo with the latest. steve, do you think that we could see some kind of compromise today on this? >> reporter: martha, we are certainly hearing sound from the presidential teamsh to reace opposition in a push for a possible compromise. what we're likely to see in the next 90 minutes here is a meeting between egypt's president and some top judges here inside cairo. judges across the country have gone on strike. they say the president tried to put himself above the law. we could see some scaling back from a presidential team that has been surprised by the angry reaction to the move by president morsi, martha. martha: such a key moment for the future of egypt. what happens if they fail to reach any kind of compromise here? >> reporter: well for the past four days we've already seen violence in the streets not only here in cairo but other egyptian cities as well. more than 500 people wounded, one person killed. if there is no compromise today, we could see million man marches on both sides of the issue tomorrow in cairo. when you have a million people on one side, a mil
the video? >> yeah. >> that's a good question. i think there may have been a cairo element to that video. i think that may have had something to do with what happened in cairo. nobody died in cairo. and jumping to the conclusion or decide to go advance the conclusion in benghazi that, well, it's all about the video turned out to be hugely wrong and very misleading to the people that heard those talking points. we're talking about what's the difference in classified and unclassified talking points? apparently unclassified talking points are things that you can most of us, if you work hard enough, could get from anywhere. but if you've got classified talking points that show that's not right, why wouldn't you use those as well? did ambassador rice have access to different information in addition to the talking points, are i think a fair question for her and the add. >> and the president to answer. >> thank you. we got to run. more on the startling revelations about the c.i.a.'s libya talk points in a moment then dana perino, who is that, on the press corp.'s romance with the president. plus,
in cairo. >> now sparking a war of words with the president, senators are threatening to block her potential nom nation as secretary of state. >> the reason i don't trust her is because i think she knew better, and if she didn't know better, she shouldn't be the voice of america. >> senator mccain and senator graham and others want to go after somebody, they should have after me. >> we'll talk to senator lindsey graham exclusively this morning. >>> plus, the key figures trying to get to the bottom of benghazi and the petraeus affair. chair of the senate intelligence committee senator dianne feinstein of california. and chair of the house intelligence committee, congressman mike rogers of michigan. >>> then after the election, will washington get anything done? talks start on how to avoid the fiscal cliff, as mitt romney draws fire from fellow republicans by accusing the president of doling out, quote, gifts to minority groups in exchange for their vote. what's the fallout and the future of the gop? with us, tea-party backed congressman raul labrador, tom friedman, former white hous
forward. secretary of state hillary clinton is in cairo. we talked of a cease-fire yesterday at this time and so far there has been no agreement. today's events have pushed off an agreement even further. gregg: leland vittert we'll check back with you. can secretary clinton get both sides to agree on anything or are we in for more violence? jack keane will join us live. >> the labor department just releasing its weekly unemployment claims report. applications falling a little from the week before but still high at 410,000. the labor department blaming the recent spike in claims on superstorm sandy. last week's numbers were the first time we saw above 400,000 in more than a year. we are learning that has been resides up by 12,000. it was originally reported at 439,000 and was 451,000. that's an 8-month high for reporting. gregg: new applications for unemployment benefits fluctuated between 380,000 and 390,000. jobless claims have stayed above 300,000 and spiked in early 2009. they must fall below 375,000 to indicate the job market is strong enough to lower the unemployment rate. >> unions
cairo with steve hariggan, standing by live. >> reporter: the numbers are building of protesters here in tahrir square, the number of tents growing as the protesters say they are here to stay and digging in. on the street below me, over the past few minutes, we have seen young protesters, lighting bottles on fire and running. the skirmishes have wounded more than 3 people. we have seen the military begin to move large concrete block, blocking off certain narrow alleyways and protecting government buildings. explosions can be heard behind me. right now, one key thing to watch is where the protests go next. we are expecting major demonstrations on both sides on tth. those who support president morsi and think he is doing what needs to be done. and those who think he is making a power grab, trying to become a dictator. both groups will try to get out their constituents on tuesday. it will be a real test of power. the final thing to watch, the country's judges, many are saying they are going on strike. it could shut down the judicial system across the country this week. >> shannon: steve,
in cairo against president mohammed morsi and his decree granting himself nearly absolute power. more than 200,000 people packed tahrir square. >>> four female soldiers who served tours in iraq or afghanistan filed a federal lawsuit yesterday trying to force the pentagon to end a ban on women serving in combat jobs. the suit says service women have often found themselves in combat without receiving the same rewards or opportunities for promotion. >>> a federal judge is ordering big tobacco companies to run ads saying they deliberately deceived the american public about the health effects of smoking. appeals are expected. >>> and prince william and his wife kate who became the duke and duchess of cambridge on their wedding day last year made their first official visit to cambridge this morning. the couple are meeting with students from cambridge university. they will also visit a homeless charity and hospital. >>> here's how wall street will kick off the day. the dow fell 89 points yesterday. the s&p was down seven. the nasdaq lost nine. overseas markets were also down. in tokyo, the nikkei
. >> unbelievable. more than 100,000 people flooded into downtown cairo. this time they are protesting the current president martha maccallum and his power grab. they are disillusioned with what he has brought to their country. then you have this happening. police firing teargas. gypt's highest courts refusing to work in protest of morsi's actions. steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo. the protests looked like the unrest we saw in that same square back in 2009 and the arab spring and the overthrow of mubarak. how dangerous is it? is it more dangerous now? >> this certainly allows similarities between what we saw last night and those demonstrations that overthrew mubarak. hundreds of thousands of people are energized. many of them want this president out. but a couple of important differences. the current president martha maccallum was elected by 52% of the vote just five months ap a - the current president mohamed morsi haas elected by 52% of the vote. martha: it was a close election and the other choice may have been a more democratic choice. people were searching for new leadership and th
. clashes erupted in cairo between police and protesters who have been occupying central tahrir square. >> they about to stay put until president morsi withdraws from power. >> he insists that his decree is necessary for national security and is only temporary. >> police used tear gas to try to disperse the crowds, but the morning after mass protests, many demonstrators vowed to stay put. critics feel cheated. they say the president's decrees go against the spirit of egypt's revolution. the opposition once he is well on his way to becoming an islamist autocrat, not a precedent for all egyptians as promised. >> what you did to us, mr. president -- you divided the country in half. shame on you. >> tuesday's demonstrations lasted well into the night. some 300,000 people flooded onto tahrir square, numbers not seen since the fall of hosni mubarak. the crisis has mobilized egypt's political opposition, who called on protesters to stay put. there have been clashes with police. one demonstrator died of tear gas inhalation. public anger has spread to other cities in egypt. in alexandria, prote
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 209 (some duplicates have been removed)